The Louvre: Inauguration of the Islam Art Department

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the Louvre presents its new space devoted to the Arts of Islam: some 3,000 objects from its valuable collection.

Launched by former President Jacques Chirac and continued by Nicolas Sarkozy, the project reached completion after ten year.

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The Museum’s newest department
In 2003, the Musée du Louvre created its eighth department dedicated to Islamic art. Boasting 14,000 objects and admirably complemented by 3,500 works from the Musée des Arts Décoratifs — many of which are being exhibited for the first time — its collection reflects the wealth and breadth of artistic creation from Islamic lands.

In 1893, a “Muslim art” section was created at the Musée du Louvre and the first room dedicated to the Islamic collection was opened within the Department of Decorative Arts. The collection was expanded considerably under two curators, Gaston Migeon and Emile Molinier. The bequest of Baroness Delort de Gléon in 1912 enriched the section with prestigious objects from her husband’s collection and led to the creation of the Salle Delort de Gléon in 1922 in the Pavillon de l’Horloge.

In 1932, the Department of Asian Arts was created and housed the Islamic collections. After World War II, in 1945, the Far Eastern works were transferred to the Musée Guimet, and the Islamic section was incorporated into the Department of Near Eastern Antiquities; the works were first exhibited in the Salle de la Chapelle of the Pavillon de l’Horloge and then in two rooms at the end of the Department of Near Eastern Antiquities.
In 1993, the creation of the Grand Louvre and the departure of the Ministry of Finance from the Richelieu wing made room for the Islamic collections in 1,000 sq.m of exhibition space.

Embracing new horizons, the department will open in 2012 to 3,000 sq.m of new exhibition space, nestled between the restored facades of the Cour Visconti. Led by Rudy Ricciotti and Mario Bellini, the project is the museum’s greatest architectural work since the Grand Louvre; soon visitors will be able to admire the new glass veil of undulating gold metal covering the courtyard like the wing of a dragonfly.

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Creation of the collection

In 2003, the Musée du Louvre created its eighth department dedicated to Islamic art. Boasting 14,000 objects and admirably complemented by 3,500 works from the Musée des Arts Décoratifs — many of which are being exhibited for the first time — its collection reflects the wealth and breadth of artistic creation from Islamic lands.

In 1893, a “Muslim art” section was created at the Musée du Louvre and the first room dedicated to the Islamic collection was opened within the Department of Decorative Arts. The collection was expanded considerably under two curators, Gaston Migeon and Emile Molinier. The bequest of Baroness Delort de Gléon in 1912 enriched the section with prestigious objects from her husband’s collection and led to the creation of the Salle Delort de Gléon in 1922 in the Pavillon de l’Horloge.

In 1932, the Department of Asian Arts was created and housed the Islamic collections. After World War II, in 1945, the Far Eastern works were transferred to the Musée Guimet, and the Islamic section was incorporated into the Department of Near Eastern Antiquities; the works were first exhibited in the Salle de la Chapelle of the Pavillon de l’Horloge and then in two rooms at the end of the Department of Near Eastern Antiquities.
In 1993, the creation of the Grand Louvre and the departure of the Ministry of Finance from the Richelieu wing made room for the Islamic collections in 1,000 sq.m of exhibition space.

Embracing new horizons, the department will open in 2012 to 3,000 sq.m of new exhibition space, nestled between the restored facades of the Cour Visconti. Led by Rudy Ricciotti and Mario Bellini, the project is the museum’s greatest architectural work since the Grand Louvre; soon visitors will be able to admire the new glass veil of undulating gold metal covering the courtyard like the wing of a dragonfly.

Source: Louvre website

Dernière modification : 25/09/2012

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